Monday, June 18, 2012
LIONSXII RAN RIOT AGAINST SABAH WITH A 9-0 VICTORY
It was a night to remember for LionsXII and the 6,289 fans at th...
Tuesday, June 12, 2012
HOME UNITED BASKETBALL CLUB WINS FOURTH WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP
Home United Basketball Club won the 2012 Women’s National ...
Monday, June 04, 2012
SINGAPORE FOUGHT OFF DETERMINED INDONESIA TO WIN MEN’S UNDER-23 AND WOMEN’S WATER POLO GOLD
Singapore and Indonesia went head-to-head in the men’s Und...
Friday, June 01, 2012
SOUTHEAST ASIA FINEST AQUATIC STARS TO COMPETE IN INAUGURAL SEA SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS
Friday, June 01, 2012
Shape Run 2012
Wednesday, May 30, 2012
SINGAPORE WATER POLO MEN’S TEAM KICKS OFF SEA SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIPS WITH AN EMPHATIC WIN OVER THAILAND
Singapore kick started their bid to prove they are the region...

Coaches Corner: Luan Ching

Singapore badminton coach Luan Ching gears his charges for the upcoming Li Ning Open. (Photo: SSC) 


A man whose reputation precedes him, Luan Ching was instrumental in China’s victory in the prestigious Thomas Cup along with two Asian Championships. Rated as one of the world’s best players during his day, his personal honours also include victories in the All England Singles and the World Badminton Grand Prix.
 
Having coached perennial badminton powerhouses China and South Korea, he is now here in Singapore, looking to impart his midas touch and to teach our shuttlers how to weave the same magic on the court.
 
A down to earth man with a realistic approach, he has not set sky high standards for his players. Instead he has used his first year here in Singapore to go back to basics, restructuring the team and building up every player’s physical condition.
 
Being able to challenge China and South Korea is not his immediate priority rather his primary focus is to raise the standard of our play to emerge as a regional powerhouse before gradually taking on the big guns. .
 
Though this arduous process will take time to bear fruit, Luan feels that such an emphasis is the right way forward as he draws on his six year coaching experience in Taiwan; a country that he feels has a very similar sporting culture to Singapore.
 
Indeed, there are already positive signs emerging from this regimen as Luan cheerfully shared how in the recent top tier competitions such as the super series, our players have bettered themselves and even progressed to as far as the  quarter-finals stages.
 
“In the last year, I have certainly seen an improvement in our standard of play. Initially we were struggling against the likes of Malaysia and Taiwan but now our players are giving Korea and even China a good fight. It is no longer an entirely one sided affair and slowly we are closing the gap,” he quipped.
 
As our shuttlers prepare to do battle in the upcoming super series, the Li-Ning Singapore Open2011, Luan is keeping their feet on the ground as he admits that it may still be awhile before we capture a super series.  Certainly, with top nations sending in their best players to win qualifying points for the upcoming 2012 London Olympic Games, Luan is hopeful but remains realistic of the tough challenge ahead.
 
“If we get a top nation such as China or South Korea in the first round, then it’s definitely going to be tough, but if we get an easier opponent in the first few rounds, then the confidence gained from winning those matches coupled with the backing of the home crowd, I’m sure our players can do well and progress far in the competition.”
 
However, Luan is  optimistic as he has been impressed with how our shuttlers have fared recently, and he believes that the competition will provide a good platform for his charges to gain valuable match experience against top- class opponents.
 
With such a steady rise towards the top, Luan is looking towards the future and in the long term, hopes to build a pathway for Singapore badminton, ensuring that there will always be younger players ready to take over whenever the senior players decide to call time on their careers.
 
“The key to a long term plan is having the people to succeed, because if you don’t invest in the development of the younger plans then there would be no long-term plan. Because when the senior players retire, there will be no succession and we will be at a dead end.”